Glyn Humphreys

Glyn Humphreys

Glyn Humphreys is Professor of Cognitive Psychology at the University of Birmingham and Scientific Director of the Birmingham University Imaging Centre. Glyn gained his BSc and PhD in Psychology from the University of Bristol (1976 and 1979) and took up a Lectureship in Psychology at Birkbeck College in 1979. He went on to be appointed Chair of Psychology at Birkeck College in 1988 before moving to Birmingham in 1989 to establish a new cognitive science research centre. Glyn's research is concerned with the cognitive neuroscience of vision, attention and action. It uses a variety of methods, particularly neuropsychological studies of individuals with brain lesions but also functional brain imaging (fMRI, EEG/ERP), trans-cranial magnetic stimulation and computational modelling. Glyn has been awarded the British Psychological Society's Spearman Medal (1986), its Cognitive Psychology Prize and its President Award (both 1999). He has been awarded Fellowships of the Humboldt Foundation, the Association for Psychological Science, the Belgian Experimental Psychology Society, the Academy of Social Sciences and the Royal Society of Medicine. He has been President of the Experimental Psychology Society and a member of grant committees with the BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, the Stroke Association and the Leverhulme Trust. 

16th Annual OPAM 2008: Action and Attention: An Intimate Coupling

Over the past ten years one influential view of visual information processing is that action and perception can be de-coupled. In this paper, however, I will argue that action and perception can be intimately related through the operation of visual attention, with attention being (i) directed to the locations where stimuli will appear, and (ii) to action relations between stimuli. I will present examples of the inter-dependency between attention and action using behavioural data from normal participants and neuropsychological patients, as well as physiological data from ERP and from fMRI. The results suggest that visuo-motor responses can be evoked rapidly and direct attention to locations and properties of stimuli that match an intention for action.

 

 

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