Mark Georgeson

Mark-Georgeson.jpg

Professor Mark Georgeson was educated at Preston Catholic College and Cambridge University where he studied Mathematics and Experimental Psychology (B.A. 1970). He worked on a variety of topics in spatial vision at Sussex University (D.Phil. 1975), then took up a lectureship at the University of Bristol (1976), moved on to Aston University (Birmingham, UK) as Reader in Vision Sciences (1991), then to Birmingham University as Professor of Psychology (1995). In 2001, he moved back to Aston as Professor of Vision Sciences. He has published about 80 papers on research topics in human vision, especially on spatio-temporal filtering operations and coding processes in spatial vision, motion perception and binocular vision. He is co-author (with Bruce & Green) of the widely used textbook Visual Perception: Physiology, Psychology & Ecology (1996, 2003). With Prof. Tim Meese, he is funded by research grants from UK research councils (EPSRC, BBSRC) to study spatial vision and binocular vision, and was previously funded by the Wolfson Foundation and the Wellcome Trust amongst others. He is active in the UK Applied Vision Association (Chairman 2005-8), was on the editorial board of  Vision Research (2000-2008) and Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics (2007-2010), and is currently active on the editorial boards of Perception (1998- ) and Journal of Vision (2003- ).

Craik Club 2008: Four Decades of Spatial Frequency Channels: A Scale-space View of Spatial vision

 

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