Yu Fang

YuFang

Yu Fang spent his undergraduate days at Guangdong Ocean University in China. He then went to Japan and received his Master degree of Information Sciences at Tohoku University in 2012. He is currently in his second year of his PhD at the laboratory of visual cognition and systems in the Research Institute of Electrical Communication at Tohoku University. His study interest are the eyes, head and body coordination.

APVC 2013 - Eye position distribution depending on head orientation in watching Ultra High Definition Television.

Yu Fang1, Masaki Emoto2, Ryoichi Nakashima3, 4, Kazumichi Matsumiya3, Ichiro Kuriki3, Satoshi Shioiri3,4 1 Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University;2 NHK Science & Technology Research Laboratories;3 Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University;4 Japan Science and Techno logy Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science & Technology.

A gaze is directed to a point of interest in the visual field and the shift of gaze is accomplished with combinations of eye, head and body movements. Previous studies showed a unique correlation between horizontal eye position and horizontal head orientation during visual search experiment with simple stimuli (Fang et.al, VSS2012), or during observation of the stationary scenes (Nakashima et.al, APCV2012). When the head is oriented to the left or the right with respect to the body, the eye tends to look left or right relative to the head. In this study, we investigated the collaborative movements between the eye and the head while viewing videos in a much more realistic condition than previous ones. We used an 85 inch 8K ultra high-definition television (UHDTV) display, which had a resolution of 7680 × 4320 pixels (33.2 megapixels). Participants on a chair watched video clips of several types of scenes made for UHDTV without any restriction of headmovements (the body seldom moved in the chair). The video was displayed for about 15 minutes and the participants performed two simple tasks: to press a key when they noticed the change of scene (usually between clips) and to estimate the degree of blur when they noticed blurring of the image (sometimes fast motion created image blur). The results showed a correlation between horizontal eye position and head orientation, which is similar to that of our previous studies. That is, when the head is oriented to the left or the right with respect to the body, the eye tends to look left or right relative to the head. The findings suggest that head movements may be an important factor to evaluate the viewing condition of large field display such as that of a UHDTV

 

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Eye position distribution depending on head orientation in watching Ultra High D